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What is an MRI scan?

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What is an MRI scan?

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is primarily a medical imaging technique most commonly used in radiology to visualize detailed internal structure and limited function of the body. MRI provides much greater contrast between the different soft tissues of the body than computed tomography (CT) does, making it especially useful in neurological (brain) and musculoskeletal imaging.

Unlike CT, it uses no ionizing radiation, but uses a powerful magnetic field to align the nuclear magnetization of (usually) hydrogen atoms in water in the body. Radio frequency (RF) fields are used to systematically alter the alignment of this magnetization, causing the hydrogen nuclei to produce a rotating magnetic field detectable by the scanner. This signal can be manipulated by additional magnetic fields to build up enough information to construct an image of the body.

What is a CAT Scan?

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A Computed tomography (CT) scan also known as a CAT scan is a medical imaging method employing tomography created by computer processing. Digital geometry processing is used to generate a three-dimensional image of the inside of an object from a large series of two-dimensional X-ray images taken around a single axis of rotation.

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When Can I Return to Playing Sport?

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Sports that can be participated in after 2 months are swimming, cycling and golf. Sports that should not be attempted until 6 year post operation are high-impact contact activities: badminton, tennis, squash, rugby, judo, hockey, football.

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When Can I Return to Work?

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The time when you are ready to return to work depends on the individual as well as your type of job. As a general guideline:

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What is a herniated disc?

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Spinal Stenosis

A herniated disc-  better known as a slipped disc - is  not actually slipped at all. Rather it ruptures or splits as illustrated in the video. It is normally a further development of a previously existing disc tear, a condition in which the outermost layers of the anulus fibrosus are still intact, but can bulge when the disc is under pressure.  Sometimes the jelly inside the disc protrudes as a free fragment into the spinal canal. this is termed a sequestered disc prolapse.

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